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To read our latest views on the Information Management market and the evolving role for Content Services and Robotic Process Automation (RPA) – download our presentation from the recent AIIM & Nuxeo Webinar here >> https://www.slideshare.net/MartynChristian/undrstnd-group-aiim-nuxeo-webinar-information-management-solution

 

 

 

Over the years I have seen some great examples of what I call “Market Momentum” – this is when the needs of businesses are deliberately accelerated by vendors into a storm of interest, marketing excitement, showcase customer success and sometimes, just sometimes, not always…. a little bit of overblown hype!

I remember the early days of Microsoft NT and SQL Server – when the industry giants at the time, IBM, Sun, Oracle, were blown away as Microsoft’s marketing machine went to work to establish a new price/performance standard for database servers in the market. Or years later when Salesforce.com grabbed the CRM mantle from Siebel Systems and Oracle to generate an overwhelming interest and demand for Cloud-based customer engagement and management solutions.

Of course this never happened in the Enterprise Content Management (ECM), now “Content Services” market, much to chagrin of CEO’s at Documentum (who tried hard but ultimately were a mid-tier B2B solution vendor who managed Wall Street expectations extremely well), FileNet (who  never invested enough in marketing and sales to drive the market awareness and adoption needed) and others who endured the slowest burn growth market of all time.

Geoffrey Moore explained this massive market momentum acceleration in his book Inside the Tornado – it seemed a bit of a fantasist ride for most software industry veterans but talking to peers who worked for Microsoft, Siebel, Salesforce.com etc.  when it happens it really is a wild ride of unbridled enthusiasm with vendors feeding on the newly established projects and budgets from  the customer – and sometimes everything just comes together for a year or two to create great growth and a degree of hype that vendors love to wrap themselves in if they possibly can.

Now that ECM has moved to Content Services, and Business Process Management (BPM) has been unleashed into the world of digital business automation and doused with the jet fuel of Robotic Process Automation (RPA)… are we about to see another of these market momentum accelerations?

This week I spent an hour with an executive of one of the world’s leading RPA vendors – stories of doubling employee headcount, 100%+ revenue growth, building subsidiaries in 20 countries around the globe, customer events with double the number of expected attendees…. this all started to sound very exciting to me.

Next week in Las Vegas, IBM’s customer conference  THINK! will be held for the first time – I would expect attendee figures to possibly be as high as 35,000 – and at the center will be a huge push for digital business and business process automation with keynotes from such information management luminaries at Geoffrey Moore  himself, Aaron Levie, CEO of BOX and  CIO’s from companies like American Airlines and Bradesco Bank. One doesn’t normal associate IBM with surfing the market momentum wave, yes, they try hard and create innovative solutions like Watson but at their heart they are a business process automation company – always were, probably always will be – with thousands of business consultant, business process technologies from database to analytics and everything in between.

My point here is that the ECM and Information Management markets that we know so well and have been around forever were always driven by workflow, business process automation, and robotic process automation before anyone ever coined the RPA term. Managing information at rest is interesting but the cost savings and productivity benefits are slim pickings BUT when information moves, inside companies or outside to customers, to vendors, to supply chains – now the productivity improvements and cost savings of managing those workflows and processes better can be immense.

It was always my belief that when the market understood that business process automation was where the real value in information management is then there would be a big shift and acceleration in growth…maybe this is the time?

My RPA company executive made me smile with thoughts of a tornado like future for vendors I work with today who have worked diligently to build solutions that manage  content and its associated business processes for many years – it doesn’t matter what you want to call it but automating workflows that accelerate business and increase productivity is what is going to make people, companies and even whole economies successful in the years ahead – market momentum is indeed a beautiful thing!

 

Martyn Christian

Founder & Managing Partner, UNDRSTND Group LLC

 

The state of the art in marketing practices continues to evolve at a breakneck pace in our social, mobile, viral, info-tainment, personalized experience and short attention span driven world.  And the small software and services companies that we work with at UNDRSTND Group are finding it challenging to keep up.  So, let’s think about this practically and pragmatically, because for these B-2-B technology solution businesses, marketing is just a means to an end, not an end in and of itself.

 

If you don’t have a thought provoking, compelling and actively updated Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram and Web presence does this make you a bad company? No, of course not, but expectations are high for many that use these tools.  So, for the person who relies on Twitter for much of their news and interaction with the world at large, your failure to engage them on that platform could be problematic, if they are good target for your solutions.  But if you repeat this line of thinking for every viable channel of communications to your target audience it can become overwhelming and beyond the means of a small software and services company to address.

 

The story is similar on the content front.  Thought leadership blogs or more ambitious white papers are popular today.  Other people respond best to short videos but they better be entertaining and professionally produced which can become expensive.  And many people would prefer to consume complete self-discovery experiences on your website where they learn most everything they need to know about your offerings at their own pace without having to interact with a human and it better not be boring either (think about our experience as consumers on automobile manufacturer web sites exploring and building our dream car).  And of course, the pressure to constantly update material is greater than ever.  Oh, and have you implemented a chat function on your website?  Not yet? then you better get after it!

 

Now that we have shocked and depressed the small software and services business owner with a modest marketing budget, let’s get back to what we are trying to achieve with our marketing efforts and that is to drive revenue.  We’re not trying to win marketing awards or impress our neighbors with the cool company we are running … we’re trying to make our sales targets.  And to that end, let’s get practical and pragmatic with some ideas for how to make marketing work for us today:

 

  1. Less can be more. You’re better off investing in five really good marketing assets than spreading yourself too thin trying to have twenty pieces of collateral that end up being not compelling and become dated before you can circle around to all of them on a refresh cycle.
  2. Have a compelling website. It is the outside world’s window into your business.  So, don’t let that be a window into your cluttered garage full of old boxes and lawn equipment.  And remember that less can be more, so five really compelling pages is better than twenty pages of dated material.
  3. Drive them to your website. Once you’ve made sure that your website is good, use many of the other channels to drive people to your website.  A modest but compelling presence on social media that motivates people to visit your website is a good step.
  4. Multi-Channel Your Content. Do one really nice video to make sure to touch the YouTube crowd and reuse it across all your channels.
  5. Leverage other people’s content. Find well thought of businesses with larger marketing budgets with whom you don’t compete and ride their coat tails through thoughtful links and commentary around their thought leadership.
  6. Make marketing everybody’s job. Just about everybody in a small company can pitch it and help with your social presence.  The whole team should be active on social media building a following and promoting your brand and your message as part of their everyday jobs.

 

These are just a few high level practical ideas that we hope will spur your thinking and get you started down the road to successful marketing on a small budget in today’s world.  And if you still need help on this front, we’re always here at UNDRSTND Group.

 

Brent Bussell
Founder and Managing Partner
UNDRSTND Group